Don't petition the White House, Use Change.org

Don’t petition the White House, Use Change.org

Nov 18, 2012 Aaron Krager No Comments
Secessionists. I first want to say thank you for finally learning something from history. The last time so many desired to rid themselves of a tyrannical president they declared war on the Union. Thus, your use of a peaceful means through petitions on the White House’s site is commendable. Furthermore, each state now finds themselves represented by a petition and signatures from people possibly wanting to secede from the United States. Texas leads the way with more than 100,000 people asking the White House to address the issue. This is the same state governed by Rick Perry who drummed up his base of supporters with calls for seceding prior to his Republican bid for President. The irony seemed lost on him. Governor Perry is obviously not a viable option to lead the cause. He hardly put up a fight against a weak group seeking his party’s nomination. I also question...
The Country Moved to the Left Last Night

The Country Moved to the Left Last Night

The whole campaign season did not just depend upon the presidential race that finally came to an end last night. Yes, the country voted clearly to give Barack Obama another four years in the White House. He received more than 50 percent of the vote and won handily in the electoral college. Yet, it is what happened down the ballot that shows the nation’s move toward progressive values. It appears that Democrats will pick up a couple seats in the lower chamber but the real change happened on the senatorial level. Voters said no way to Republicans Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock after they attempted to scapegoat women and downplay the trauma of rape and sexual abuse. Furthermore, women won in Massachusetts, North Dakota, Hawaii, and Wisconsin for their first terms. All four of them will be more progressive legislators than their predecessors. In Wisconsin Tammy Baldwin will be the...
Republicans, Rape, Life, and Control of Women

Republicans, Rape, Life, and Control of Women

Oct 24, 2012 Aaron Krager No Comments
During last night’s Indiana Senate debate the Republican candidate, Richard Mourdock, did more than stick his foot in his mouth. I believe life begins at conception. The only exception I have for to have an abortion is in the case of the life of the mother. I struggled with myself for a long time but I came to realize life is that gift from God, even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape. It is something that God intended to happen. Mourdock joined a club made exclusively of Republicans but a club that seems to be growing as the November election nears. Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh made a reprehensible comment about exceptions for the life of the mother following his debate. “There is no such exception. With modern technology and science, you can’t find one instance.” Complete crap as this woman explains. Of course who can forget Missouri...

Politics of the separation of church and state

Oct 26, 2010 Aaron Krager No Comments

You are not supposed to talk about politics and religion at the dinner table. At some of my family gatherings you just don’t talk about politics unless you want an argument. For some people the two go hand in hand. One’s faith dictates their politics through the moral teachings of their religion.

Since Christine O’Donnell’s recent debate performance with Chris Coons in which she asked where the separation of church and state was in the Constitution.

Many commentators have expressed their disbelief in her lack of knowledge in this regard. Now Senate candidate Ken Buck in Colorado has shown the same disregard for the principal.

“It was not written into the Constitution. While we have a Constitution that is very strong in the sense that we are not gonna have a religion that’s sanctioned by the government, it doesn’t mean that we need to have a separation between government and religion.”

He goes on in the video the comment about the movement away from a culture. That is the crux of the argument these conservatives have with the doctrine. It is the epitome of their culture war.

In college I had more than a few arguments about this same topic. The question was always “where in the Constitution is the phrase separation of church and state?” These tend to be people who take the Bible literally. That the words in that book are the actual words of God. That is their basis so they are looking for a literal understanding of the Constitution. In O’Donnell’s debate performance she seemed more than perplexed at the legal reasoning being given by Coons. She was confused by the establishment clause of the “government shall make no law” and what that meant.

This movement is one that has a complete lack of understanding that the people who came to this land sought religious freedom. And upon the founding of this country 150 years after the landing at Plymouth Rock still believed governmental bodies should not push religion. Instead they view it as Christian nation. It was founded by Christians and thus Christians should have the right to do nearly whatever. Prayer in public schools. Sure. And in this argument they miss out on the fact that students can actually pray in a public school. If I wanted to I could pray – I could even pray with a classmate. But the school cannot force me to pray or lead in prayer. That would be supporting a religion. The first amendment expresses exactly that. Thus the separation of church and state.

But Ken Buck and Christine O’Donnell and others who believe just like them cannot or do not care to understand that connection. For them it is the foundation of their culture war. A war on Christmas, a crusade against gay rights and the restriction on choice.

If they can win this fight they then win all of them because their version of Christianity would dominate our political structure as well as our policies. As much as their faith tells them they are right to believe in Jesus Christ and the Bible – they believe their politics are right as well.

There is not reasoning with someone who has a faith that is not willing to be challenged.

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